The Need for School Communication Solutions Is Becoming More Evident Every Day

Building an effective communication program nearly from scratch can be an awesome challenge.

15646865853_cea8e2fca8_oIncreasingly, superintendents see the need to communicate in a transparent fashion to build understanding and support for their schools. They know that they have to do something about quelling the mounting social media attacks and growing overall criticism of their schools and staff before more damage is being done to the reputation of their schools and staff.

Experience tells them that things never used to be this bad. Sure, they had critics who would send a letter to the Board or local editor, but those occasional situations were far from the piling on we see today through social media. If this were a football game, a flag would be thrown for unnecessary roughness and rudeness.

Your first reaction may be to get into a social media whizzing match with the critics, but that tactic simply leads nowhere real fast. And as our current round of presidential primary debates vividly demonstrate, just combating attacks with facts really doesn’t seem to work anymore.

 

Time to Build a Public Relationship Program One Block at a Time

What you need in this environment is a planned communication program that is built to absorb critical hits without demeaning the impact of your schools and staff.

And these communication programs and efforts must directly relate to your “raison d’être” — to improve teaching and learning in your schools. If the communication effort does not find a way to support the core of your system’s everyday efforts, you must retool it to do just that.

Better programs also follow the standards of our school communication profession. Currently NSPRA offers its standards through our publication, Rubrics of Practice and Suggested Measures. It asks you to focus on 4 pillars of a communication program:

  • Comprehensive planning and structure,
  • Internal communication,
  • Parent and family communication, and
  • Marketing and branding communication.

A 5th pillar — crisis communication — is now being studied by NSPRA professionals.

This resource clearly gives you the insight about what you must do to set the building blocks of your program. Throughout each of the 4 areas, you’ll notice that most elements focus on building relationships with your key target audiences who can become ambassadors and reputation makers for local your school community.

If you want to learn more, NSPRA actually has 2 resources to help you get a PR program going:

  • The first is Rubrics of Practice and Suggested Measures mentioned above. Buy it at a minimal price at www.nspra.org.
  • The second is a free resource entitled, Communication E-Kit for Superintendents. Just go to Superintendents e-kit and download it.

 

The best way to turn reputation breakers into positive reputation makers is to build an ongoing, transparent program from the very start.

In this case, if you build it, the reputation makers will come.

 

Rich Signature-bold cropped

Rich Bagin, APR
NSPRA Executive Director

Photo courtesy of Jim Cummings, APR, Glendale Elementary School District

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Explore posts in the same categories: Communication, Education, school communication, school communication, school PR

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