Persuasion Strategies to Make Your Messages Stick

8268543370_da8c21bf81_oIf you don’t follow marketing guru Seth Godin’s daily blog, you should. It’s a quick scan that will make you think and possibly adapt his thoughts to planning your work. You can catch it here to subscribe.

Last week he offered his thoughts on what motivates people to take action. He called the blog, The Super Bowl Is for Losers. He pointed out that the people of Minnesota spent a half billion dollars to build the indoor stadium and make concessions to host the event now two Sundays ago. And he noted that they will probably lose money just like other cities have who built stadiums to demonstrate that they too were first-class cities.

He asks, “So why does it keep happening? “Why, despite volumes of documented evidence, do well-intentioned people spearhead new projects like this?”

 

How does Godin’s message help us?

Godin offers some insightful lessons on human behavior that I’ll try (in italics) to translate for those of us in school communication:

  • The project is now. It’s imminent. It’s yes or no. You can’t study it for a year or a decade and come back to it. The team (your local coalition) creates a forcing function, one that turns apathy into support or opposition. So in this era of “instant everything,” we may need to jump on that trend to talk about the wonderful new school you plan to build with pictures of the gleaming new building they will be visiting in the years ahead to represent their caring community.
  • The project is specific. Are there other ways that Minneapolis could have effectively invested five hundred million dollars? Could they have created access, improved education, invested in technology, primed the job market? Without a doubt. But there’s an infinite number of alternatives vs. just one specificWe need to be specific in our building campaigns as well. Providing new spacious, technology-enhanced safe schools for our crumbling school infrastructure is the specific goal we’re after.
  • The end is in sight. When you build a stadium, you get a stadium. When you host a game, you get a game. That’s rarely true for the more important (but less visually urgent) alternatives. We need to point to our immediate end of building a school and the results that the school will bring to students and the community.
  • People in power and people with power will benefit. High-profile projects attract vendors, businesses and politicians who seek high-profile outcomes. And these folks often have experience doing this, which means that they’re better at pulling levers that lead to forward motion. We need to capture some of these same powerful leaders to work with us in building what’s best for their children, grandchildren, and total community. It’s time to leave no generation behind.
  • There’s a tribal patriotism at work. “What do you mean you don’t support our city?” And what do you mean that you don’t support our children, grandchildren, and future taxpayers and leaders in our community? We’ve worked too hard and too long to give up on our children and our school community. We’re proud to be a member and advocate for all that our homes and families stand for.

 

Godin ends his blog by noting that in the face of human emotions and energy, a loose-leaf binder from an economist has no chance. And in his example, the stadium was built and the Super Bowl arrived.

And, as I have been saying for years that, “When facts and emotions collide, emotions win just about every time.” It’s time to lead with emotions and there’s no better way to tap those emotions by doing what’s best for all our children in all our respective school communities.

Once again, if we don’t do it, who will?

 

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Rich Bagin, APR

NSPRA Executive Director

 

Photo by Jim Cummings, APR, Glendale Elementary School

 

 

 

 

 

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