Expose the Negative Education Rhetoric for What It Is: Our Critics’ Brand of Propaganda

logo-anaheim-2018-sample-girl-10012017.jpgIn late July, we just concluded NSPRA’s very successful national Seminar in Anaheim, California, where more than 1,000 participants (local school communication professionals, superintendents, association leaders, corporations, and other school officials) rallied around our theme of Proving the Value of Public Education.

In my opening message to our audience, I noted that we’re in the midst of the strongest competition we’ve ever faced in our lifetime — a roiling political climate that gives short shrift to the importance and worth of public education, and one that supports half-baked privatization solutions that are based on an approach of  “leave-no-fat-wallet-behind.”

My point was that all of us at the Seminar — alongside the more than 10 million others working in schools across the country — need to stand up and become both active and reactive whenever and wherever we see public education being bashed.

 

Time to Squelch the “If-You-Know-Nothing, Say-Something” Crowd

We have so much to be proud of, but yet we continue to let those who vociferously rally behind the “If-You-Know-Nothing, Say-Something” banner when they talk about public education.

We can’t stay silent when ignorant talking points become the norm in our communities.  It’s time to let people know how wrong these hollow critics are.

The more of us who join in letting folks know just how wrong they are, the better chance we have of making a significant difference in our local communities.

Leadership organizations have offered their Stand Up for Education Campaigns and we applaud their work. But we need more of a “ground game” that confronts these false accusations in a forceful but civil way. Reach down and muster up the feelings that made you become an educator, and use that forceful emotion to verbally prove why public education is better now than it has ever been.

Here’s a start:

Check out this video from East Aurora School District 131 in Illinois. In a positive, moving manner, it clearly demonstrates the value of our public schools.

video screen shot

EASD 131: Personal Grad Walk – Diego Terrazas

 

As you just saw in the video, like East Aurora, in the normal course of our business every day, we take struggling students at a tender age and teach and nurture them to become successful in school and in society. It’s one of the best attributes we have to prove that public education is one of our local communities’ most valuable assets. I often say that our students can tell our story better than we can. Follow the video’s example and strive to find ways to develop UNFORGETTABLE stories about the impact that public education has on your kids and your community.

Those of us in this profession have the fine-tuned skills, the professional judgment, and the strong-held beliefs that can begin turning our communities into believers and advocates for public education.

 

One More Point — and It’s a Four-Letter Word

Day in and day out, we all need to roll up our sleeves and do our part to overcome the pervasive negativity about public schools. But there’s a four-letter word that can help put us on the right path and change the destructive tide that’s seeping in everywhere.

And that is — VOTE! 

Start with yourself. Then work within your communities with voter registration programs to set a climate that practicing citizenship can make a difference.

We can talk and lead, but in the end, we all need to vote.

 

Who’s for Kids and Who’s Just Kidding?

As a 501(c)(3) organization, NSPRA can’t tell you how to vote, but we can urge you to vote. In any election about every candidate, you just need to answer this question: “Who’s for kids and who’s just kidding?”

The answer should make your choices crystal clear.

 

 

richs-signature-blue2

Rich Bagin, APR

NSPRA Executive Director

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Explore posts in the same categories: democratic society, Education, school choice

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