What Does Your District Stand For?

IMG_0066What does your district stand for?

What makes it different or better than other school districts?

What is your “elevator speech” when asked about your schools?

Over the years we’ve seen many approaches that school professionals take to help define their authentic response when they describe their districts in a compact and meaningful way.

Years ago, I even wrestled with creating NSPRA’s own elevator speech description and the result was our current tagline, NSPRA Is the Leader in School Communication. There are other ways we could have described who we are because we provide communication training, leadership, resources, and insight, but because NSPRA’s approach is comprehensive — and that is what makes us exceptional — we decided that our best descriptor was The Leader in School Communication.

Recently, Dr. Susan Enfield, Superintendent of the Highline Public Schools in Washington, and the current NSPRA at-large Board member representing superintendents shared her system’s approach to defining their school district with the development of the Highline Promise. (Highlineschools.org/OurPromise).

Along with her talented communication staff, she implemented the Promise after going through a strategic planning process. We decided to share just one element of their thoughtful approach.

In a nifty 4- by 3-inch accordion fold-out brochure that can easily be slipped into a pocket or pocketbook, the piece begins with:

The Highline Promise:

Every student in Highline Public Schools is known by name, strength and need, and graduates prepared for the future they choose.

It goes on in its brief style to list the District’s Foundation encompassing:

  • Equity: We will disrupt institutional biases and inequitable practices so all students have an equal chance of success.
  • Instruction: We will reduce achievement and opportunity gaps by using culturally responsive, inclusive, standards-based instruction.
  • Relationships: We will know our students by name, strength and need and have open, two-way communication with students, families and community partners.
  • Support: We will increase student success by supporting their social-emotional and academic needs.

But wait there’s more:IMG_0069

The little foldout even contains the 5 goals of the system on the flip side. Yes, I know the content is way too much for an elevator speech — unless you are on slow elevator in a Qatar, Saudi Arabia high rise. But the beauty of this small publication is that when you give it out to people, they now have a copy of what you stand for and what your district hopes to accomplish for all your children. It’s likely that they will share it with others because it hits its mark so effectively. They may even follow-up by going to the link to learn more about Highline. And it will be a conversation–starter about what makes Highline better because it focuses on the need, strength and name of ALL students.

So, well done, Highline Public Schools. You’ve taught us all a valuable lesson in just a small way.

richs-signature-blue2

Rich Bagin, APR

NSPRA Executive Director

 

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